Technology

Google Grilled in Congress: What's Ahead for Tech Companies
Business Owners Need to Teach Staffers About Password Safety
Cuba Health Mystery: Diplomats Had Inner-Ear Damage Early On

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Business Owners Need to Teach Staffers About Password Safety

Google Grilled in Congress: What's Ahead for Tech Companies

By Joyce Rosenberg |
It may seem obvious: Companies' computers, mobile devices and accounts need secure passwords. But many small business owners don't take the time to educate staffers about...

Facebook Hosts Offline Privacy 'Pop-Up' in New York City

Facebook Hosts Offline Privacy 'Pop-Up' in New York City

By Barbara Ortutay | Dec 16
Wrapping up a year of privacy scandals, congressional hearings and a host of other problems, Facebook hosted a one-day "pop-up" event in New York City's Bryant Park on Thursday, hoping to talk to users.

Bad Review? Owners Should Address Online Reviewers' Concerns

Bad Review? Owners Should Address Online Reviewers' Concerns

By Joyce M. Rosenberg | Dec 16
Marketing consultants and owners themselves say the best way to handle negative online reviews is to acknowledge that the customer is unhappy and offer to discuss the problem offline.

Who's Mining Your Internet Data the Best? Would you Believe PornHub?

Who's Mining Your Internet Data the Best? Would you Believe PornHub?

Dec 16
What companies data-mine your Internet experience the best? Would you be surprised it isn't streaming giants like Netflix, Amazon and YouTube? No, it is the porn industry.

Eyes in the Sky Capture Carbon, Other Climate Culprits

Eyes in the Sky Capture Carbon, Other Climate Culprits

By Frank Jordans | Dec 16
A growing fleet of satellites is monitoring man-made greenhouse gas emissions from space, spurred by the need to track down major sources of climate changing gases such as methane and carbon dioxide.

Photos from Japan Space Rovers Show Rocky Asteroid Surface

Photos from Japan Space Rovers Show Rocky Asteroid Surface

By Mari Yamaguchi | Dec 16
Japan's space agency says more than 200 photos taken by two small rovers on an asteroid show no signs of a smooth area for the planned touchdown of a spacecraft early next year.